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The Centre for Human Rights, University of Pretoria, in partnership with the Democracy Development Program (DDP), under the umbrella of the established Pan-African Parliament (PAP) CSO forum, is hosting a dialogue to engage young Africans on matters related to Africa’s politics and development and the workings of the PAP in particular.

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Webinar

Thursday 26 November 2020
Webinar (Zoom)
09:00 GMT  /  10:00 WAT  /  11:00 SAST  /  12:00 EAT 

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Theme: Young people’s role in shaping Africa’s development through engagement with the Pan-African Parliament Youth Caucus

Speakers

  • Welcome remarks and dialogue background
    Ms Bonolo Makgale, Manager: Democracy and Civic Engagement Unit, Centre for Human Rights, University of Pretoria
  • Opening remarks from the Pan-African Parliament
    Vice-President of the PAP Youth Caucus
  • Keynote Address
    Honorable Naledi ChirwaMember of National Assembly of South African (EFF, youngest MP of the 27th Parliament)

Moderator

  • Mr Sphamandla Brian Mhlongo, DDP Senior Programmes Officer

Panellists

  • Mr Lukhayo Neer, Thabo Mbeki Foundation 
  • Ms Aderonke Ige, Nigerian Human Rights Lawyer/ Social Justice Crusader 
  • Mr Perminus Moinogu, Researcher

Methodology

Online meeting - panel discussion with an interactive Q&A sesion.

Background

The Pan-African Parliament (PAP) has become an important part of the African Union (AU) institutional landscape, aimed at strengthening African governance and democracy. The PAP works to promote popular participation and representation in the continent’s decision-making. People’s participation is at the core of AU activities. The Constitutive Act of the African Union make provisions for the inclusion of civil society and citizens in the programmes of the AU. It articulates an Africa that is people-centered. The preamble of the Constitutive Act, for example, talks of a union that is guided by common vision of a united and strong Africa and by the need to build a partnership between governments and all segments of civil society. The PAP as an organ of the AU seeks to provide a formal platform for African people to participate fully and meaningfully in decision-making processes on matters affecting the continent in all spheres of life, including human rights, rule of law, good governance, democracy, peace and security, integration and development.The Pan-African Parliament (PAP) has become an important part of the African Union (AU) institutional landscape, aimed at strengthening African governance and democracy. The PAP works to promote popular participation and representation in the continent’s decision-making. People’s participation is at the core of AU activities. The Constitutive Act of the African Union make provisions for the inclusion of civil society and citizens in the programmes of the AU. It articulates an Africa that is people-centered. The preamble of the Constitutive Act, for example, talks of a union that is guided by common vision of a united and strong Africa and by the need to build a partnership between governments and all segments of civil society. The PAP as an organ of the AU seeks to provide a formal platform for African people to participate fully and meaningfully in decision-making processes on matters affecting the continent in all spheres of life, including human rights, rule of law, good governance, democracy, peace and security, integration and development.

The mandate of the PAP as a representative of the people of Africa  cannot be implemented without engaging and involving citizens in the activities of the PAP.  Specifically, for the continent, it is important to engage with young people, as they comprise a significant portion of the population. In 2019, almost 60% of Africa’s population was under the age of 25, making Africa the world’s youngest continent. According to the UN’s demographic projections, the median age in Africa is going to be 19.8 in 2020 and by 2030 Africa’s population will be 1.6 billion with a 42% rapidly growing  youth population . By the year 2100, Africa’s youth population could be equivalent to twice Europe’s entire population. Given the need for urgent action, it is important to convene spaces for constructive engagement with young people on matters related to Africa’s development and Agenda 2063 in particular.

Expected outcomes

  • The sensitisation of young Africans on the workings of the PAP and explore potential avenues to engage on key themes of the PAP sessions
  • Informing the plenary agenda, to centre issues related to young Africans and their development
  • Developing policy documents/briefs to the PAP youth caucus, with an aim to support PAP’s mandate

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For more information, please contact:

Ms Bonolo Makgale
Programme Manager Democracy and Civic Engagement Unit

Tel: +27 (0) 12 420 4199
Fax: +27 (0) 86 580 5743
bonolo.makgale@up.ac.za