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In 2012, the Centre for Human Rights, in collaboration with la Rencontre Africaine pour la Défense des Droits de l’Homme (RADDHO), a non-governmental organisation (NGO) based in Senegal, submitted a communication to the African Committee of Experts on the Rights and Welfare of the Child (Committee) regarding the violation of the rights of a group of children in Senegal, colloquially regarded as Talibé children. 

The positive implications of the Committee on the Rights of the Child to host the first ever United Nations treaty body session outside of Geneva.

In conversation with Professor Ann Skelton

The Centre for Human Rights, Faculty of Law, University of Pretoria, cordially invites you to a webinar organised by the Children’s Rights Unit on the occasion of the 35th Ordinary Session of the African Committee of Experts on the Rights and Welfare of the Child (ACERWC). The webinar will focus on children’s rights in the digital age in Africa.

The Centre for Human Rights, University of Pretoria (the Centre), is implementing a two-year project on Children’s Privacy in the Digital Sphere. The overall goal of the project is to promote enhanced protection for children’s right to privacy in the digital sphere in Africa. This goal will be achieved through three main interventions: research for evidence and knowledge building on the standards and practice on children privacy online; evidence based advocacy for children’s privacy in the digital sphere, and capacity building to enhance the development and implementation of relevant protections to enhance online privacy for children. The first pillar of the project entails knowledge building on the regional and domestic standards governing children’s privacy when navigating the internet. One of the main components of this aspect is a regional study which seeks to foster evidenced-based understanding of key issues relating to children’s privacy online in the African context.

Accordingly, the Centre seeks to institute a regional study to analyse the legal protection and practical enjoyment of children’s right to privacy in the digital sphere in the African Context. By utilising concrete examples and authoritative information from African countries, the study is expected to generate the empirical basis for the capacity building and advocacy elements of the project. The study will explore the international and regional standards on children’s privacy online, and identify the standards and key issues in protection of children’s right to privacy in the digital sphere in Africa.

On 16 June 2020, the Centre for Human Rights, University of Pretoria, held a webinar organised by the Children’s Rights Unit on the occasion of the Day of the African Child 2020. The webinar focused on the issue of access to a child friendly justice system in Africa, against the backdrop of the 30 year anniversary of the adoption of the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child, and the prevailing COVID-19 pandemic.

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In 2012, the Centre for Human Rights, in collaboration with la Rencontre Africaine pour la Défense des Droits de l’Homme (RADDHO), a non-governmental organisation (NGO) based in Senegal, submitted a communication to the African Committee of Experts on the Rights and Welfare of the Child (Committee) regarding the violation of the rights of a group of children in Senegal, colloquially regarded as Talibé children. 

The positive implications of the Committee on the Rights of the Child to host the first ever United Nations treaty body session outside of Geneva.

In conversation with Professor Ann Skelton

The Centre for Human Rights, Faculty of Law, University of Pretoria, cordially invites you to a webinar organised by the Children’s Rights Unit on the occasion of the 35th Ordinary Session of the African Committee of Experts on the Rights and Welfare of the Child (ACERWC). The webinar will focus on children’s rights in the digital age in Africa.

The Centre for Human Rights, University of Pretoria (the Centre), is implementing a two-year project on Children’s Privacy in the Digital Sphere. The overall goal of the project is to promote enhanced protection for children’s right to privacy in the digital sphere in Africa. This goal will be achieved through three main interventions: research for evidence and knowledge building on the standards and practice on children privacy online; evidence based advocacy for children’s privacy in the digital sphere, and capacity building to enhance the development and implementation of relevant protections to enhance online privacy for children. The first pillar of the project entails knowledge building on the regional and domestic standards governing children’s privacy when navigating the internet. One of the main components of this aspect is a regional study which seeks to foster evidenced-based understanding of key issues relating to children’s privacy online in the African context.

Accordingly, the Centre seeks to institute a regional study to analyse the legal protection and practical enjoyment of children’s right to privacy in the digital sphere in the African Context. By utilising concrete examples and authoritative information from African countries, the study is expected to generate the empirical basis for the capacity building and advocacy elements of the project. The study will explore the international and regional standards on children’s privacy online, and identify the standards and key issues in protection of children’s right to privacy in the digital sphere in Africa.

On 16 June 2020, the Centre for Human Rights, University of Pretoria, held a webinar organised by the Children’s Rights Unit on the occasion of the Day of the African Child 2020. The webinar focused on the issue of access to a child friendly justice system in Africa, against the backdrop of the 30 year anniversary of the adoption of the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child, and the prevailing COVID-19 pandemic.