fbpx
  • Premium
  • Standard Compliant Channels
  • $100
  • Completely synergize resource taxing relationships via premier market
  • 10 GB of space
  • Support at $15/hour
  • Sign Up

Background

The rapid growth in recent years of internet access and the technologies enabling its use has been a catalyst redefining the overall development of global economies, including Africa. The use of the internet and related technologies has also become a central issue within the human rights discourse in the current decade. The discourse acknowledges both the positive contributions of technology, such as those that enhance certain protections and guarantees and those that negatively facilitate human rights violations in other respects. 

The African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child (African Children’s Charter or Charter) was adopted 31 years ago. To date, 50 countries have ratified the African Children’s Charter, which demonstrates a growing commitment to the respect, protection and promotion of the rights of children. There is no doubt that the Charter has contributed immensely to the development of standards and practices related to children in the region.

On 15 September 2021, EndCode and the Centre for Human Rights, University of Pretoria, will co-host the launch of the Model Guidelines on Age-Appropriate Design for Online Services — an Impact Amplifier Africa Online Safety Fund project, funded by Google.org, Google’s philanthropic arm.

EndCode and the Centre for Human Rights, University of Pretoria, will co-host the launch of the Model Guidelines on Age-Appropriate Design for Online Services — an Impact Amplifier Africa Online Safety Fund project, funded by Google.org, Google’s philanthropic arm.

S3 E6: #Tech4Rights- Children’s rights to privacy in the digital sphere in Africa

In conversation with Ms Opal Sibanda

On 20 July 2021, the Centre for Human Rights, Faculty of Law, University of Pretoria (UP), held a webinar organised by the Children’s Rights Unit and the and the Expression, Information and Digital Rights Unit. The focus was on children’s rights to privacy in the digital sphere in Africa. This event forms part of the Centre’s campaign #Tech4Rights which focuses on the impact of new technologies on different aspects of human interaction and its impact on human rights.

The Centre for Human Rights, University of Pretoria seeks to appoint a consultant(s) to conduct a child-focussed study meant to draw from children’s own understanding of their role in the implementation of the frameworks.

The annual Advanced Human Rights Course on Children’s Rights in Africa is currently underway. The course is hosted as a continuing collaborative effort between the Centre for Human Rights, the Centre for Child Law at the University of Pretoria and the Dullar Omar Institute at the University of Western Cape.

On 16 June every year, the African continent celebrates the Day of the African Child (DAC). The African Union (AU) designated this Day to commemorate the contributions of the children and young people to the liberation of South Africa from apartheid, exemplified by many of them being shot during protest action on this day in 1976. In the years since its establishment, the DAC has been used to highlight pertinent issues affecting the rights and welfare of children in Africa, and to remind African countries of their promise and commitments to protect the rights of children in Africa.

The Centre for Human Rights, Faculty of Law, University of Pretoria, the Forum for African Women Educationalists (FAWE), the ACERWC CSO FORUM and the Eastern Africa Child Rights Network, cordially invite you to a webinar on Tuesday 15 June 2021, on the occasion of the Day of the African Child (DAC) which is commemorated on 16 June every year. The webinar will focus on the theme of Accelerating the implementation of Agenda 2040 for an Africa fit for children.

Against the background of the 30-year anniversary since the adoption of the Charter, the Centre instituted a multi-country study on the implementation of the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child (the Charter) in ten African Countries, in 2020. The study documented the extent to which the ten countries have domesticated and implemented the Charter. 

Child participation is one of the general principles of children’s rights. It is a principle that has gained gradual support and acceptance among child rights advocates and practitioners, who, recognizing its pivotal role in fostering the optimum development and exercise of rights by children. This growing acceptance notwithstanding, child participation is also one of the least developed areas of rights in practice. There is still significant resistance to children’s participation in mainstream society, which results in either exclusion of their voices, or tokenist participation that does not meet the threshold of meaningful participation.

The African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child (African Children’s Charter or Charter) was adopted 31 years ago. To date, 50 countries have ratified the African Children’s Charter, which demonstrates a growing commitment to the respect, protection and promotion of the rights of children. There is no doubt that the Charter has contributed immensely to the development of standards and practice related to children in the region.

In 2012, the Centre for Human Rights, in collaboration with la Rencontre Africaine pour la Défense des Droits de l’Homme (RADDHO), a non-governmental organisation (NGO) based in Senegal, submitted a communication to the African Committee of Experts on the Rights and Welfare of the Child (Committee) regarding the violation of the rights of a group of children in Senegal, colloquially regarded as Talibé children. 

The positive implications of the Committee on the Rights of the Child to host the first ever United Nations treaty body session outside of Geneva.

In conversation with Professor Ann Skelton

The Centre for Human Rights, Faculty of Law, University of Pretoria, cordially invites you to a webinar organised by the Children’s Rights Unit on the occasion of the 35th Ordinary Session of the African Committee of Experts on the Rights and Welfare of the Child (ACERWC). The webinar will focus on children’s rights in the digital age in Africa.

The Centre for Human Rights, University of Pretoria (the Centre), is implementing a two-year project on Children’s Privacy in the Digital Sphere. The overall goal of the project is to promote enhanced protection for children’s right to privacy in the digital sphere in Africa. This goal will be achieved through three main interventions: research for evidence and knowledge building on the standards and practice on children privacy online; evidence-based advocacy for children’s privacy in the digital sphere, and capacity building to enhance the development and implementation of relevant protections to enhance online privacy for children. The first pillar of the project entails knowledge building on the regional and domestic standards governing children’s privacy when navigating the internet. One of the main components of this aspect is a regional study that seeks to foster an evidence-based understanding of key issues relating to children’s privacy online in the African context.

On 16 June 2020, the Centre for Human Rights, University of Pretoria, held a webinar organised by the Children’s Rights Unit on the occasion of the Day of the African Child 2020. The webinar focused on the issue of access to a child friendly justice system in Africa, against the backdrop of the 30 year anniversary of the adoption of the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child, and the prevailing COVID-19 pandemic.

The UNCRC and its practical implications in the African context 

In conversation with Adv Karabo Ozah

The Centre for Human Rights (the Centre) in partnership with Equality Now, Girls not Brides, Human Rights Watch and Plan International hosted a panel discussion on the recently adopted Joint General Comment to End Child Marriages and the Report on Child Marriage, commissioned by the African Commission on Human and People’s Rights (African Commission). 

Bamako, Mali, 24 April 2018

Honourable Chairperson and members of the African Committee of Experts on the Rights and Welfare of the Child, I thank you for this opportunity to address you on the occasion of the 31st Ordinary Session of this honourable Committee. The Centre for Human Rights conveys its gratitude to the Committee for granting our application for observer status during the 30th Ordinary Session in Khartoum, Sudan in December 2017. We are pleased that granting us observer status will further facilitate our engagement with the Committee for the promotion and protection of children’s rights on the continent, especially through the full, effective and efficient implementation of the provisions of African Children’s Charter.

On 20 May 2017, students from the Human Rights and Democratisation in Africa (HRDA) programme launched a campaign against children accused of being witches in Africa. The campaign ended on 7 June 2017. The campaign, also known as #ChildNotWitch, aims to create awareness around children in various African countries, accused of being witches and the abuse and even killings that are a result of these accusations.